Chinese New Year Week

Hi guys! Sorry for the lack of update. As you may or may not know, last week was Chinese New Year. And yes, we do get our own New Year.. Not only that, we also get a Chinese birthday and a Western birthday.

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New Year Eve’s dinner (Chinese)

For other type of cultural festivals, I can usually control my weight efficiently. However, during Chinese New Year, there is no way I can do that. With all the yummy CNY snacks lying in every room of the house, it is impossible for me not to gain anything.

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Lou Sang

On the eve of Chinese New Year, most Chinese people would go back to their hometown and have the reunion dinner with their family. During the reunion dinner, there would be a ‘lou sang’ where everyone would yell stuff using Chinese proverbs which would have the meaning of prosperity, abundance of wealth, longetivity or having more children. It is believed that the higher you toss, the higher likelihood for your wish of being granted.

For the next few days, we would visit the rest of the family to get Ang Pows / Red Packet (only the married adults need to give red packets). Don’t worry about not having enough time to collect your ang pows. You have 1 month to visit each and everyone of your relatives.

We would also have lunch and dinner with various friends and family, and these aren’t your usual fare. I have had at least 5 ‘lou sang’ sessions, and I have been eating a feast from the Eve until Chor 9 (the 9th day of Chinese New Year). 

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On Chor 8, at exactly 12am, there would be fireworks blasting all over as the Hokkiens ‘Pai Tien Kong’ – pray to the Jade Emperor.

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Lining up the firecrackers
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More firecrackers 
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Making an offering 

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Apparently, the tradition started on the day when the war (not sure which) ended. The day they came out from hiding was the 8th / 9th of the Lunar New Year which coincides with the Jade Emperor’s birthday. Prior to that, the Hokkiens were hiding in the sugar cane plantations. Thus, during the praying ceremony, you’d see houses with sugar cane leaning against the door or at the altar. These sugar canes would have folded pieces of gold paper on it and it forms part of the offering to the Jade Emperor.

Chor 9 officially marks the end of my holiday, and my eating spree. I should watch what I eat for now. Took me one year to lose 2kg and 1 month to gain 5kg. What a life. #notcomplaining 

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2 thoughts on “Chinese New Year Week

  1. Looks like an excellent spread of food. So true about all those temptations lying around, especially the fried mini popiahs, I can eat a whole can in one sitting. :/
    Your CNY seems merrier than mine; many cousins now opt for vacations instead of returning to visit the hometown. But anyway, Hope you had a great one!

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    1. I have to start looking for gym! This happens every year.
      This year is a little bit more interesting because all my cousins that is staying overseas came back.
      Hope your CNY is a great one too! Did you go to any Chap Goh Meh Festival?

      Like

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